A home seller may dread the thought of dealing with an aggressive property buyer, i.e. an individual who submits many requests for property improvements or price reductions prior to the closing of a home sale. Fortunately, we’re here to help you take the guesswork out of dealing with an aggressive homebuyer.

Now, let’s take a look at three tips to help a home seller get the best-possible results when he or she deals with an aggressive property buyer.

1. Keep Your Cool

Let’s face it – an aggressive homebuyer may test your patience. But if you remain calm, cool and collected when you deal with an aggressive homebuyer, you may be better equipped than ever before to accomplish your desired home selling results.

Remember, the ultimate goal of the house selling journey is to maximize your property sale earnings. If you remain open to communication with a buyer, both you and this individual can work together to find common ground. And as a result, you and a buyer can collaborate to achieve the optimal results.

2. Know Your Options

If a buyer makes exorbitant requests during the home selling journey, it is important to keep in mind that you have options. And if problems start to escalate, you may be able to walk away from a property selling agreement.

For example, if an aggressive buyer conducts a home inspection and asks for a massive price reduction following the evaluation, you can still negotiate with this buyer. And if you and the buyer cannot come to terms, there is no need to stress. At this point, you can move on from a potential home sale and re-list your residence.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

Dealing with an aggressive homebuyer can be worrisome. For sellers who want to avoid the potential dangers associated with dealing with an aggressive buyer, it may be beneficial to hire a real estate agent.

In addition to guiding you along the property selling journey, a real estate agent is happy to help you negotiate with a buyer and his or her agent. That way, you can boost the likelihood of enjoying a quick, profitable house selling experience.

Typically, a real estate agent will serve as a liaison between you and a buyer. And if a buyer requests property upgrades or a price reduction prior to closing day, a real estate agent can offer recommendations about how to proceed with these requests.

A real estate agent also is available to respond to any of your home selling concerns or questions. This housing market professional understands the property selling experience can cause a seller to worry, especially if this individual is forced to deal with an aggressive buyer. But with a real estate agent’s assistance, a seller can take the necessary steps to minimize potential property selling hurdles.

Simplify a negotiation with an aggressive homebuyer – use the aforementioned tips, and any home seller can seamlessly navigate a negotiation with any buyer, at any time.

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Selling a home takes patience. Especially when you’re balancing your time between settling into your new home, and keeping up with your work and family life. So, when you’ve finally gotten to the point of accepting an offer on your home, you’ll probably breathe a sigh of relief–and you should!  However, there are still a few more things that will need to happen and a couple of things to consider before closing the deal on your home sale.

Contingencies on the purchase contract

A purchase contract typically includes contingency clauses that are designed to protect the interests of both the buyer and the seller. These clauses mean that the contract is contingent upon the actions being completed before it can be legally valid.

There are three main contingencies that will likely be included in the purchase contract before closing–inspection, financing, and appraisal.

Inspection contingency

The inspection contingency allows the buyer to have the home inspected by a professional before closing (the time should be specified within the contract, but the inspection should usually occur no more than two weeks after you accept the offer). A home inspection lets the buyer know what to expect in terms of repairs that the home needs now or will need in the near future.

Financing contingency

Since the vast majority of buyers will be purchasing their home through a loan, a financing contingency is included to allow the buyer time to secure their mortgage. Getting pre-qualified and pre-approved makes this process easier, but the buyer will still have to finalize and close on their mortgage before their financing is official.

This clause exists to protect the buyer in the event that their mortgage application is denied, ensuring that they aren’t penalized.

Appraisal contingency

The third contingency most often found in purchase contracts is a home appraisal. The buyer will order an appraisal and then the appraiser will reach out to you to find a day to come and value your home.

If the home is then appraised at the amount agreed upon in your contract, this contingency is met. However, if the appraisal comes up lower than the purchase amount, the buyer can renegotiate the price.

Walkthrough and closing

Once the appraisal and inspection have been met and financing secured, the buyer will have a chance to do a final walkthrough of your home. The walkthrough usually occurs no more than two days prior to closing on the sale. A walkthrough allows the buyer view the home one last time to ensure that the condition of the home hasn’t drastically changed since the home was inspected or appraised. So, make sure the buyer is aware of any changes you planned to make to the home before closing.

Now you’re ready to close on your home sale. You’ll receive a disclosure form to review (read it carefully!) and sign. Once closing is complete, ownership of the home is officially transferred to the buyer.

While the closing process does include several steps, it’s important to be available and cooperative along the way to ensure a smooth sale and transition into your new home.

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